Navy Dads

Aviation Electronics Technician AT
Aviation Electronics Technicians (AT) troubleshoot and repair digital computers; fiber optics; infrared detection; radar systems; electricity generation systems; laser electronics; navigation systems; communications equipment; electrical power distribution; pressure indication systems; electric transformers and circuits, employing the latest test equipment and procedures. Knowledge and skills also include equipment operational checkout, corrosion control, scheduled maintenance, and component removal/repair/replacement.

What They Do

AT Sailors attend common basic electronics training, after which they attend Aviation Electronics Technician (AT) “A” School.
The AT sailor will troubleshoot and repair some of the following complex electronic systems, employing the latest test equipment and procedures:

• digital computers

• fiber optics

• infrared detection

• radar systems

• electricity generation systems

• laser electronics

• navigation systems

• communications equipment

• electrical power distribution

• pressure indication systems

• electric transformers and circuits

Technicians may also perform the following functions:

• Installing changes, alterations, and modifications to aircraft electronics systems;

• Performing micro-miniature module repair on computer circuit cards;

• Using a variety of electrical measuring and diagnostic equipment;

• Reading electrical system diagrams;

• Repairing and maintaining power generators and electric motors. 

Qualifications and Interests

Personnel in this field must be U.S. citizens eligible for a security clearance. Normal color perception is required.
Applicants in this career field will work on some of the most technologically advanced aircraft in the Navy. Applicants should have an interest in aviation and working with or around aircraft. They should have a high degree of manual dexterity with tools, equipment, and machines for detailed precision work. They should have a strong interest in electrical or computer systems and be ready to tackle a tough academic curriculum in electronics training. They
should have a desire to be resourceful parts of a team effort. Helpful attributes include arithmetic knowledge, writing ability, speaking skills, good memory, and physical fitness.

Working Environment

Sailors in this career field will perform duties at sea and ashore around the world. At various times they could be working at a land-based aircraft squadron or onboard an aircraft carrier, either indoors or outdoors, in a shop environment or in office surroundings, and at a clean lab bench or in a garage-type situation. They work closely with others, require little supervision, and do mental and physical work of a technical nature.

AT - Aviation Calibration Technician

Aviation Calibration Technicians will communicate with Production Control and Quality Assurance work centers in order to ensure timely and accurate work products according to the Naval Aviation Maintenance Program (NAMP). They work on test equipment and components in the following types of equipment: Precision Measuring Equipment (PME), Electronic Test Equipment, and Physical Measuring Equipment. They will conduct troubleshooting procedures using critical thinking skills and deductive reasoning. They are proficient in interpreting schematics for electronic circuits and gain a greater understanding of the theory supporting basic and advanced electronic test equipment.

AT - Aviation Electronics Intermediate Level Technician

Aviation Electronics Intermediate Level Technicians communicate with Production Control and Quality Assurance work centers in order to ensure timely and accurate work products according to the Naval Aviation maintenance Program (NAMP). They will maintain, repair, troubleshoot, and inspect a vast array of mission navigation, radar, and communications avionics equipment. They will display an in-depth understanding of the operational theory of their assigned equipment and knowledge of basic through advanced troubleshooting procedures. Reading and interpreting schematics for electronic and advanced electronics test equipment is required.

AT - Aviation Electronics Organizational Level Technician

Aviation Electronics Technician Organizational Level Technicians will communicate with Maintenance Control and Quality Assurance work centers in order to ensure timely and accurate work products according to the Naval Aviation Maintenance Program (NAMP). They will maintain, repair, troubleshoot and inspect various Aircraft Avionics Systems. They will display an in-depth understanding of the operational theory of their assigned equipment and knowledge of troubleshooting procedures. Reading and interpreting schematics for electronics and advanced electronics test equipment is required.

ATI - Intermediate Level Automatic Test Equipment Technician

Intermediate Level Automatic Test Equipment (ATE) Technicians communicate with Production Control and Quality Assurance work centers in order to ensure timely and accurate work products according to the Naval Aviation Maintenance Program (NAMP). They will be proficient in operating, maintaining, repairing, troubleshooting and inspecting specific automatic test equipment, weapons replaceable assemblies, units under test sub-assemblies, and support equipment. They will display and in-depth understanding of the operational theory of their assigned equipment and knowledge of troubleshooting procedures. Reading and interpreting schematics for electronics and advanced electronics test equipment is required.

Opportunities for placement in this career field are excellent for qualified personnel. About 7,000 men and women now work in this field.

Navy ATO - Aviation Electronics Organizational Level Technician

Aviation Electronics Technician Organizational Level Technicians will communicate with Maintenance Control and Quality Assurance work centers in order to ensure timely and accurate work products according to the Naval Aviation Maintenance Program (NAMP). They will maintain, repair, troubleshoot and inspect various Aircraft Avionics Systems. They will display an in-depth understanding of the operational theory of their assigned equipment and knowledge of troubleshooting procedures. Reading and interpreting schematics for electronics and advanced electronics test equipment is required.

Aviation Electronic, Electrical and Computer Systems Technicians
(AV)

Aviation Electronic, Electrical, and Computer Systems Technicians work with some of the most advanced electronics equipment in the world and repair a wide range of aircraft electrical and electronic systems. Repair jobs can range from trouble-shooting the computer-controlled weapon system on an F/A-18 Hornet on the flight deck of an aircraft carrier to repairing circuit cards or tracing electrical wiring diagrams in an air-conditioned work center. Most of these technicians are trained in computers to support state-of-the-art equipment or on power generators and power distribution systems to support aircraft electrical systems.

These technicians may also volunteer to fly as Naval aircrewmen. Aircrewmen perform numerous in-flight duties and operate radar and weapon systems in turbojet, helicopter, or propeller driven aircraft. Aircrewmen earn additional pay for flying. (See the Aircrew Program for details.)

What They Do

AV sailors attend common basic electronics training, after which they are selected for either the Aviation Electrician (AE) rating or the Aviation Electronics Technician (AT) rating.

Depending on selection to AE or AT, the AV sailor will troubleshoot and repair some of the following complex electronic systems, employing the latest test equipment and procedures:

• digital computers

• fiber optics

• infrared detection

• radar systems

• electricity generation systems

• laser electronics

• navigation systems

• communications equipment

• electrical power distribution

• pressure indication systems

• electric transformers and circuits

Technicians may also perform the following functions:

• Testing aircraft instruments and systems such as automatic flight controls, inertial navigation, and compass systems;

• Installing changes, alterations, and modifications to aircraft electronics systems;

• Performing micro-miniature module repair on computer circuit cards;

• Using a variety of electrical measuring and diagnostic equipment;

• Reading electrical system diagrams;

• Repairing and maintaining power generators and electric motors.

Career Path After Recruit Training

Enlistees are taught the fundamentals of this rating through on-the-job training or formal Navy schooling. Additional training for specific aircraft or equipment is generally received before reporting to operational activities. Advanced technical and specific operational training is available in this rating during later stages of career development.

Class "A" technical school, Pensacola, FL. 18-26 weeks of aviation basic theory and basic technical knowledge, aviation electrical systems, skills of electricity and electronics theory.

School assignments vary with individuals. When initial training is completed, AV technicians are selected into either the Aviation Technician (AT) or Aviation Electrician (AE) ratings and may be assigned to naval air stations, squadrons, aircraft carriers or other aviation facilities in the United States or overseas. During a 20-year period in the Navy, they will spend about 60 percent of their time assigned to fleet units and 40 percent to shore stations.

 AT: The American Council of Education (ACE) recommends that credit be awarded in the vocational certificate or a lower-division bachelor's/associate's degree category for courses taken in this rating on basic electronics, trouble-shooting techniques and introduction to physics.
 AE: The American Council of Education (ACE) recommends that credit be awarded in the vocational certificate or a lower-division bachelor's/associate's degree category for courses taken on aircraft electrical maintenance in this rating.

Qualifications and Interests

Personnel in this field must be U.S. citizens eligible for a security clearance. Normal color perception is required.

Applicants in this career field will work on some of the most technologically advanced aircraft in the Navy. Applicants should have an interest in aviation and working with or around aircraft. They should have a high degree of manual dexterity with tools, equipment, and machines for detailed precision work. They should have a strong interest in electrical or computer systems and be ready to tackle a tough academic curriculum in electronics training. They
should have a desire to be resourceful parts of a team effort. Helpful attributes include arithmetic knowledge, writing ability, speaking skills, good memory, and physical fitness.

Opportunities for placement in this career field are excellent for qualified personnel. About 13,000 men and women now work in this field.

 

 

** Note: AE and AT combine at paygrade E-9 to the rating of Master Chief Avionics Technician (AV)

 

 

 

110120-N-0092J-005 EL CENTRO, Calif. (Jan. 20, 2011) Aviation Electronics Technician 2nd Class Brandon Settle, from Pensacola, Fla., assigned to the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, performs the duties of ground safety observer while members of the crew chief work center conduct turn instruction during a morning turns evolution in El Centro, Calif. The Blue Angels are deployed to El Centro to prepare for the upcoming show season. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Andrew Johnson/Released)

 

 

 

 

 

110207-N-5646R-009 MEDITERRANEAN SEA (Feb. 7, 2011) Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Andrew Gaither, assigned to the Dragonslayers of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 11, performs preventative maintenance on a Sea Hawk helicopter aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65). Enterprise is deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Jared M. King/Released)

 

https://navydads.ning.com/forum/topics/at-aviation-electronics

Navy Learning and Development Roadmap ATI

Navy Learning and Development Roadmap ATO

 

 

 

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